Mesothelioma: Second Hand Asbestos Exposure

Second Hand Asbestos Exposure Lawyers, Mesothelioma Lawsuits

What is Secondhand Exposure to Asbestos?

Secondhand asbestos exposure, also known as secondary asbestos exposure and drive-by asbestos exposure, are terms used to describe situations where individuals come into contact with asbestos materials or products containing asbestos, often unknowingly. This exposure typically occurs when family members or bystanders are indirectly affected by asbestos fibers brought home on the work attire and belongings of those working directly with asbestos.

Secondhand Asbestos Exposure Includes:

Secondary Asbestos Exposure: This refers to individuals coming into contact with asbestos materials or asbestos-containing products indirectly. It often occurs when family members or friends are exposed to asbestos fibers brought home on the clothing or personal belongings of workers who handled asbestos.

Drive-by Asbestos Exposure: Similar to bystander exposure, drive-by exposure happens when people are indirectly exposed to asbestos in the vicinity of job sites or areas where asbestos work is being conducted. Asbestos particles released during construction or demolition activities can pose a risk to those passing by or visiting these locations.

Women and Children at Risk: Secondary asbestos exposure disproportionately affects women and children. They often face increased risks due to close contact with family members who work with asbestos. Women now represent approximately one in four diagnosed Mesothelioma cases, highlighting the gender disparity in asbestos-related illnesses.

Understanding these forms of secondhand asbestos exposure is crucial for raising awareness and taking preventive measures to reduce the risks associated with asbestos-related diseases like Mesothelioma. Seeking legal assistance may be necessary for those affected to pursue compensation for damages and medical expenses.


How Second-Hand Asbestos Exposure Occurs

When asbestos is disturbed, broken apart, cut, decayed, or damaged, it releases tiny asbestos microscopic fibrous particles that can cling to hair and clothing. These asbestos fibers are easily transferred to others where they can accumulate in the lining of lungs that cause mesothelioma lung cancer.


Asbestos is most dangerous when it is;

Understanding Asbestos Exposure Risks

Abandoned: Asbestos left behind in older buildings or structures can release harmful fibers when disturbed during renovations or demolitions.

Aged: Over time, asbestos-containing materials in aging structures can deteriorate, potentially releasing asbestos fibers into the air.

Blown Off: Materials like insulation, when damaged or deteriorated, can release asbestos fibers when disturbed, such as during maintenance or construction.

Brittle: Aging asbestos materials become fragile, breaking easily and releasing asbestos fibers when disturbed.

Broken: Any breakage or damage to asbestos-containing products, like pipes or tiles, can release asbestos fibers into the environment.

Bucked: Asbestos materials that become loose or detached from their original fixtures pose a risk when disturbed.

Burnt: Fire-damaged buildings or equipment containing asbestos can release asbestos fibers when repaired or replaced.

Carried: Workers unknowingly transported asbestos fibers on their clothing, risking secondary exposure to family members.

Chiseled: Efforts to modify or repair asbestos-containing materials, like using a chisel, can release asbestos fibers.

Cracked: Cracked asbestos materials, often encountered during construction or renovations, release asbestos when disturbed.

Crumbled: When asbestos-containing materials crumble or disintegrate due to age, they can release dangerous fibers.

Cut: Cutting asbestos products, such as pipes or insulation, releases asbestos fibers into the air.

Damaged: Damaging asbestos materials during maintenance, construction, or demolition projects poses a high risk of fiber release.

Decayed: Asbestos-containing materials that decay over time can become friable, releasing fibers with minimal disturbance.

Demolished: Demolishing structures containing asbestos can release hazardous fibers into the air, endangering workers and nearby residents.

Deteriorated: Aging asbestos products can deteriorate, becoming more likely to release fibers when disturbed.

Disturbed: Any disruption of asbestos-containing materials, whether intentional or accidental, can release asbestos fibers into the environment.

Dried: Dried-out asbestos materials can become more brittle and prone to releasing fibers when handled or disturbed.

Drilled: Drilling into asbestos-containing materials, common in construction, can release asbestos fibers.

Exposed: Asbestos-containing materials left exposed to the environment are at risk of releasing fibers when disturbed.

Falling Apart: Asbestos materials that are falling apart due to age or damage can release fibers during handling or maintenance.

Flaming: Fire can release asbestos fibers from materials, posing risks during firefighting and post-fire cleanup.

Fragmented: Asbestos materials that break into fragments can release asbestos fibers when disturbed.

Frayed: Fraying or damaged asbestos materials are more likely to release fibers when touched or manipulated.

Glued: Asbestos-containing materials held together with adhesives can release fibers when disturbed or removed.

Grinded: Grinding asbestos materials, common in construction and manufacturing, can release asbestos fibers.

Grouted: Working with asbestos-containing grout can release fibers, particularly during renovations or repairs.

Ground: Ground disturbance, such as excavation or digging, can release asbestos fibers present in soil or building materials.

Handled: Direct contact with asbestos-containing materials, including pipes and insulation, can release fibers.

Inhaled: Airborne asbestos fibers are inhaled during activities involving asbestos-containing materials, leading to health risks.

Leaked: Asbestos insulation or coatings that have deteriorated or been damaged can leak fibers when disturbed.

Loose: Loose asbestos materials, whether in an attic or elsewhere, can release fibers when disturbed during maintenance or renovations.

Marred: Any damage or alteration to asbestos-containing products can release asbestos fibers into the air.

Peeled: Removing or peeling away asbestos materials, such as insulation, can release fibers into the environment.

Pulverized: The process of pulverizing asbestos materials can create airborne asbestos fibers.

Removed: When asbestos materials are removed during renovations or demolition, fibers can be released into the air.

Replaced: The removal and replacement of asbestos-containing products can release fibers during the process.

Rotted: Rotted asbestos materials, like roofing, can release fibers when disturbed or replaced.

Sanded: Sanding asbestos-containing materials can create airborne asbestos particles.

Sawed: Sawing through asbestos products, such as pipes, can release asbestos fibers into the air.

Scorched: Heat or fire damage can release asbestos fibers from materials, posing risks during repairs.

Scraped: Scraping asbestos-containing materials during renovations or maintenance can release fibers.

Scratched: Scratching or damaging asbestos materials can release fibers when disturbed.

Shrunk: Shrunken asbestos materials may become more brittle and prone to releasing fibers when handled.

Torn: Torn asbestos materials can release fibers when disturbed or manipulated.

Touched: Direct contact with asbestos-containing materials can result in fibers being transferred onto skin or clothing.

Warped: Warping or damage to asbestos materials can release fibers during handling or renovations.

Worn Out: Asbestos-containing materials that are worn out due to age and use can release fibers when handled, disturbed, or replaced, especially in older structures.

Second Hand Asbestos Exposure and Mesothelioma

Second Hand Asbestos Exposure and Mesothelioma

Second-hand asbestos exposure, also known as “drive-by” asbestos exposure, is a rapidly growing cause of malignant Mesothelioma. It occurs when individuals are exposed to asbestos indirectly through contact with family members who bring asbestos dust or fibers home from their workplaces. This type of exposure has been well-documented, resulting in Mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases, often through asbestos-contaminated clothing during laundry.

Direct Cause of Deadly Diseases: Second-hand asbestos exposure is now recognized as a direct cause of Mesothelioma, lung cancer, asbestosis, and other life-threatening asbestos-related illnesses. U.S. courts are holding asbestos companies accountable for Mesothelioma cases caused by this type of exposure.

Global Recognition: Countries like Australia, England, and Japan have started recognizing and compensating victims of secondary asbestos exposure. The town of Libby, MT, serves as a stark example of the devastating consequences of second-hand asbestos exposure, with thousands of residents falling ill due to asbestos from the town’s vermiculite mine.

Symptoms and Latency: Similar to first-hand asbestos exposure, the symptoms related to second-hand exposure may not manifest for several decades, often appearing 10 to 50 years after the initial contact. Malignant Mesothelioma remains strongly linked to workplace asbestos exposure, underscoring the importance of awareness and legal action for those affected.

Malignant Mesothelioma has been linked to workplace asbestos exposure.


TO GET HELP – Our Nationwide Toll-Free Mesothelioma Helpline Number is 888.640.0914

Secondhand Asbestos Exposure in the Workplace

While office workers may not have traditional jobs associated with asbestos exposure, they are not immune to its risks. Second-hand asbestos exposure can occur when asbestos fibers are carried home on the clothing of family members working in asbestos-exposed industries. This unseen danger can lead to serious health issues, including malignant Mesothelioma. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed, understanding your legal rights and seeking experienced legal representation is crucial to pursuing justice and compensation.

Accountants: Office accountants may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure if they work in buildings containing asbestos materials or asbestos hazards.

Administrators: Office administrators managing facilities with asbestos issues or overseeing asbestos-related projects risk second-hand asbestos exposure.

Agents: Real estate agents dealing with properties containing asbestos insulation or materials during property transactions may be exposed second-hand to asbestos.

Aides: Healthcare aides assisting patients exposed to asbestos in healthcare settings could encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Analysts: Office analysts working in environments with asbestos-containing materials may face second-hand asbestos exposure from deteriorating asbestos products.

Assistants: Administrative assistants in offices with asbestos hazards, handling contaminated paperwork, or interacting with asbestos workers may risk second-hand asbestos exposure.

Associates: Business associates working in industries using asbestos materials could face second-hand asbestos exposure due to proximity to asbestos sources.

Attendants: Attendants in public buildings with asbestos risks or working near asbestos removal projects may experience second-hand asbestos exposure.

Auditors: Auditors reviewing financial records in offices with asbestos materials may be exposed second-hand to asbestos.

Billing & Posting Workers: Workers handling billing and posting in offices with asbestos materials or hazards may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Board Members: Board members in organizations with asbestos issues or involved in asbestos-related decisions may face second-hand asbestos exposure.

Book & Recordkeeping: Workers engaged in book and recordkeeping in asbestos-laden office environments may encounter potential second-hand asbestos exposure.

Buyers: Purchasing agents buying asbestos-containing products or materials for businesses could be exposed second-hand to asbestos fibers.

Chief Executive Officers: CEOs overseeing companies with asbestos liabilities or managing asbestos abatement projects may experience second-hand asbestos exposure risks.

Clerks: Office clerks handling asbestos-contaminated documents or working in buildings with asbestos hazards may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Collectors: Collectors dealing with antiques or items with asbestos components could face potential second-hand asbestos exposure.

Computer Workers: IT professionals working in offices with asbestos hazards or using asbestos-containing equipment may experience second-hand asbestos exposure.

Consultants: Environmental consultants working on asbestos remediation projects may be exposed second-hand to asbestos fibers.

Coordinators: Project coordinators overseeing asbestos abatement efforts or managing asbestos projects may face second-hand asbestos exposure risks.

Data Entry Workers: Workers performing data entry tasks in offices with asbestos risks or using asbestos-containing equipment may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Directors: Directors overseeing offices with asbestos issues or projects involving asbestos materials may be exposed second-hand to asbestos.

Executives: Corporate executives managing businesses with asbestos liabilities or asbestos removal efforts may face second-hand asbestos exposure risks.

Financial Managers: Financial managers handling budgets for asbestos-related projects or businesses with asbestos risks may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Human Resource Workers: HR workers in companies with asbestos concerns or asbestos-related personnel matters may be exposed second-hand to asbestos.

Inventory Workers: Workers managing inventories in asbestos-containing office environments or handling asbestos-containing products may face potential second-hand asbestos exposure.

Managers: Managers overseeing asbestos projects, office facilities with asbestos, or asbestos-related matters may be exposed second-hand to asbestos.

Office Workers: General office workers in buildings with asbestos materials or hazards may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Operation Managers: Operations managers responsible for office facilities with asbestos issues or asbestos abatement projects may face second-hand asbestos exposure risks.

Planners: Urban planners working on projects involving asbestos materials or in asbestos-prone office areas may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Presidents: Company presidents overseeing businesses with asbestos liabilities or asbestos removal initiatives may face second-hand asbestos exposure risks.

Public Relation Workers: PR workers representing organizations with asbestos concerns or working on asbestos-related communications may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Purchasing Agents: Agents responsible for procuring materials, including those with asbestos components, may be exposed second-hand to asbestos.

Representatives: Sales representatives dealing with asbestos-containing products or materials during sales encounters may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Salesman: Salesmen selling products or equipment with asbestos components may face second-hand asbestos exposure during sales activities.

Secretary: Office secretaries handling documents with asbestos content or working in asbestos-affected office buildings may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure.

Timekeepers: Timekeepers working in office environments with asbestos hazards or asbestos-containing equipment may experience second-hand asbestos exposure.

Vice Presidents: Vice presidents overseeing office departments with asbestos concerns or asbestos-related initiatives may face second-hand asbestos exposure risks.

These office workers may encounter second-hand asbestos exposure through various workplace activities and environments, potentially leading to asbestos-related health risks.

About Mesothelioma Attorneys

Mesothelioma attorneys specialize in helping individuals diagnosed with mesothelioma due to asbestos exposure secure economic damages. These damages are vital financial compensation that aims to alleviate the financial burdens accompanying mesothelioma.

Economic damages cover a wide range of expenses, including medical bills for surgeries, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, medications, and ongoing medical care. They also address lost wages and future earning capacity, acknowledging the impact mesothelioma can have on one’s ability to work.

To navigate the complexities of economic damages, mesothelioma attorneys provide essential expertise. They assess eligibility, gather crucial evidence, and advocate tirelessly to secure the compensation individuals rightfully deserve. Economic damages are a crucial lifeline for mesothelioma patients and their families, helping them manage the financial implications of this challenging disease.

Mesothelioma Claims: Mesothelioma Damages

If you’ve received a diagnosis of Mesothelioma, it’s crucial to understand that you may be eligible to seek compensation for a wide range of damages. This guide will help you navigate the complex world of Mesothelioma claims, offering insights into the various types of damages you may be entitled to recover. From Mesothelioma-specific damages to economic, medical, and even punitive damages, we’ll break down what each entails, ensuring you have the knowledge you need when considering legal action. Your journey to seeking rightful compensation starts here.

Disfigurement Damages (past and future)
Economic Damages (past and future)
End of Life Cost Damages
Exemplary Damages
Funeral Expense Damages
Future Economic Damages
General Damages
Gross Negligence Damages
Loss of Companionship
Loss of Consortium Damages
Loss of Earning Capacity Damages
Loss of Life Damages
Loss of Wages Damages (past and future)
Medical Expense Damages
Mental Anguish Damages
Monetary Compensation Damages
Nominal Damages
Non-Economic Damages
Pain and Suffering Damages
Pecuniary and Non-Pecuniary Damages
Physical Impairment Damages (past and future)
Punitive Damages
Treble Damages
Workers Compensation Damages
Wrongful Death Claims

TAKING LEGAL ACTION

When confronted with the devastating impact of a mesothelioma diagnosis resulting from asbestos exposure, pursuing legal action becomes a crucial step towards securing the compensation you rightly deserve. Our team is here to assist you in initiating a mesothelioma lawsuit with an experienced mesothelioma attorney, ensuring the protection of your rights and the delivery of justice. Discover today which Asbestos Trust Funds you may be eligible for to receive compensation.

SCHEDULE A FREE CASE CONSULTATION

Scheduling a free case consultation is your first step toward seeking justice in mesothelioma cancer lawsuits. We are ready to assess your unique situation and provide the guidance you will need during this challenging time. Take this essential step toward pursuing fair compensation for your mesothelioma-related injuries.

GET HELP FROM AN EXPERIENCED INJURY ATTORNEY

When dealing with the complexities of mesothelioma cancer lawsuits, getting help from an experienced injury attorney is crucial. For more than 24 years, we have assisted workers, veterans, and families in obtaining the compensation they deserved from negligent asbestos companies. Contact us at 888.640.0914 to secure the support you will need throughout your pursuit of fair and just compensation.

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Mesothelioma Cancer Attorneys

Mesothelioma Lawsuit Damages - Secondhand Asbestos ExposureFill out our free Mesothelioma case evaluation form and an experienced Mesothelioma lawyer will call you to immediately start processing your claim at no cost to you.

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Mesothelioma Damages: Second Hand Asbestos Exposure

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Secondhand Asbestos Exposure in Your Neighborhood

Malignant Mesothelioma

Malignant Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that affects the lining of the lungs, abdomen, heart, and major organs in the body. Mesothelioma cancer cells are in the sac lining the chest (pleura) or the abdomen (peritoneum). There are about 3,000 new fatal Mesothelioma cases diagnosed each year in the U. S. If you are experiencing any Mesothelioma symptoms, you should contact a doctor immediately.


Diagnosed With Mesothelioma?

If you or a family member has had a malignant Mesothelioma diagnosis, you are going to have a lot of questions about living with Mesothelioma. It is crucial to be aware of what legal options you have against asbestos manufacturers and companies responsible for your exposure. Mesothelioma is a seriously deadly disease.

According to the American Cancer Society, with the average survival time for people with Mesothelioma is 4-18 months.

Call TOLL-FREE 888.640.0914 now to talk with a live Mesothelioma Counselor that can answer many of your questions and give you the peace of mind that you need.